THE iKiFit BLOG

Note to self...It's up to me!

Thursday, September 18, 2014

The BIG iKi - Wednesday 5th November @ 12 noon

We all know our children are our future. We need your help to help us improve student outcomes in schools. Please.
It’s a simple as 123 ABC :-
1. The Big iKi is to highlight the powerful impact effective student engagement, clear, consistent guidelines and strong leadership can have on students futures. 
2. The Big iKi shows how technology and community partnerships are helping change our schools for the better.
3. The Big iKi is to help kick off the Safe Respectful Learners (SRL) Workshops Tour in 2015
How you can help for FREE :-
A. Grab something to use as an iKiStick You can make your own or you can purchase one before the day online at our iKiStore
B. Organise yourself or your whole office or school to join you
C. Click onto the website on the day.5th November at 11. 50 for a 12noon start on a smartboard, PC And do the 12 minute energiser.

Finally, send us an email to let us know you are taking part in the day so we can send you out all promo material associated with the event and catch up with you to see how the event went. 

Note to self.. It's up to me!

I’m guessing there aren’t many of us, when we’re being honest with ourselves, who won’t admit to having spread the blame when something hasn’t turned out as we hoped. 
Anybody who has teenagers in their lives encounters the buck passing phenomena on a daily basis. This can get painful when family members make poor choices but will take no responsibility for the consequences.
I recently came across a quote in a magazine article (about something completely unrelated) that read, “When we go to judgement our maker doesn’t ask anything about family. We are judged on ourselves alone” 
Meaning, of course, we won’t get a chance to blame our siblings or parents!
It struck a chord, so I was excited to read the following article at Flying Solo http://www.flyingsolo.com.au/ about an hour later. The headline was ;- 
“ Every time you start to complain about something, stop. Think about how you can take control of the situation and be accountable for it. ”
Their suggestion was that whenever something isn’t going to plan, use these two words ;- 
No. Excuses.
The premise for the No Excuses Mindset is simple. Every time you start to complain, stop. Think about how you can take control of the situation and be accountable for it. The author goes on to give 3 reasons why having the No Excuses Mindset can make you more successful and resilient. 
1. You will get what you want – faster
Have you ever said these words or heard someone else say them? "They haven't returned my email".
Or “I asked them for help and I’ve heard nothing back”

In this situation, ask yourself these questions:
• Do people sign a contract that says they will return my emails and calls? No, so therefore it’s my responsibility to email or call, not wait.
• Is our priority the same as the person we are asking for help or information? Often it isn’t, - in which case it’s up to us to do the follow up – or find another way to get the task done.
• If we need something done that involves somebody else, we’ll get it faster and easier if we take responsibility and “chase it up”.
2. It makes your success repeatable
When you start to make excuses about what other people do to you – or don’t, there is one big problem. What happens to you, good or bad, is not repeatable.
Conversely, if you adopt full accountability, you can analyse root causes for any situation that is within your control to ensure that your success is repeatable, and your mistakes aren’t.
Not accountable
"He didn't call me back, but finally did after two weeks. Why are people so slow?!"
Accountable
"When I follow up my emails with a call within two days, I always get a response within a week." 
3. Fear will subside
The best part about being fully accountable is that you remove the fear of not knowing. Not knowing how your customer or friend will react, not knowing if they'll call you back, not knowing if xyz will happen.
For the first time, none of these questions will matter because you will be in complete control.
You will have formulated repeatable strategies to create the outcome of your choosing.

In other words. No. Excuses. It’s up to us!

And how much nicer to be able to share credit rather than blame.
Taking responsibility for our own health is easy. A 12 minutes iKi Energiser done 2 or three times a week will soon add up to a new, energised you! Join now

All the Best,
Kim Macrae

Play your Part....or Fake it till you make it

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
What’s one thing sociologists, marketers, Hollywood producers, politicians, teachers and the ‘person on the street’ all agree on?

That we humans love stories – and use them, consciously or unconsciously as roadmaps for our lives.

It’s probably been that way since the dawn of man. Our ancestors would sit around with the rest of the tribe, clapping with joy at the pictures drawn in the dirt of how the hunters managed to bag the woolly mammoth they were all now gnawing contentedly on. Then they would gasp with horror to learn how uncle Ugg was impaled on a tusk when his spear proved too blunt and his feet too slow.

Then, as now, stories provide important information about the world we live in. They warn or thrill, inspire and advise, motivate and help us imagine and set goals.

These narratives help us decide how we should look and behave, what to avoid, when to speak or when to run, the rewards we can hope for or consequences we will suffer, dependent on our choices or actions.

To bring this analogy right up to the minute, we choose our favourite book or film, be it Neighbours, The Simpsons, or Fifty Shades of Colour!  We then take on some of the characteristics of our favourite character and mock or shun the ones we don’t like.

The Logies season is here again and we are told that the best actors practise some form of method acting, “immersing themselves in their characters, to the extent that they stay in character offstage or off-camera for the duration of a project”.

They live the part. And there is the theme for this week. Have a good think about our character and make sure we are playing the role. Sometimes it’s about acting. Fake it till we make it, sometimes it’s about looking at our role model and asking, “What would X do?”

On one level it’s just that simple. We’re all playing a part. If we’re genuine about becoming a great footballer we practise and model ourselves on a footballer we admire – who has achieved their goals. We copy their training patterns, eating patterns, thought patterns, to help build our own character.

This week think about how you want the story of your life to go. Are you writing the script or are you being swept along like an extra?

I’m thinking about how I want my story to end, and thinking about what I need to do to make that happen.

I’m  writing a happy ending and WORKING towards it.

And I’m remembering to be careful what I wish for.

Enjoy the rest of your week. 

       

 


Ask and You Shall Receive

Wednesday, February 12, 2014
I finished last weeks’ blog with a promise of sharing an experience I’ve had that shows the value of being open to the world around us.

Before I continue, I will disclose that sometimes I’ve doubted this wisdom. I’ve always prided myself as realistic, pragmatic, and yes, a bit sceptical - in a positive way of course, I’ve added to myself.

After all, the world is a big, tough place and there are lots of dangers out there.

This attitude can conflict with the belief that good things really do flow to those with an open mind and heart, - and so there have been times I’ve struggled with it.

My dad has always been a great inspiration and example to me. There are many lessons I’ve learned (sometimes by initially ignoring them, to my detriment) from him. But one of the habits I’ve always admired,  that he practises brilliantly even at 90, I’ve finally taken to heart.

He will always go out of his way to say hello and find something positive to say to everyone he comes in contact with.

The thing is, it invariably brings smiles all round, but can lead to much more ;-

I was having a coffee with son Nick in Bondi a couple of weeks ago. We were discussing his upcoming three months holiday in South America and the fact that he was keen to sublet his flat for the duration.  A simple thanks for the great coffee developed into a conversation with the waitress who, she soon revealed, was looking for a flat closer to her work.

Two doors away is pretty close. And the great thing was we had already observed that she was a hard worker, neat and organised. Could be a perfect match.

Ask and you shall receive.

I’d love to hear any personal stories you have of similar serendipity.

By the way, the word serendipity means good luck and good fortune. And the point I’m making is that our attitude and actions help us make our own good luck and fortune.

Please share. And have a great week.

       

 


Dream, Believe, Act, Achieve

Tuesday, February 04, 2014
Last weeks’ blog finished with the proverb “ The teacher appears when the student is ready”. That’s certainly true for me at the moment. Tomorrow I commence two days of ‘Outside the Box Bootcamp’ with Rebel Black

It’s important to remember that the lessons the teacher has to impart may not necessarily be things we want to hear, but rather things we need to learn.

I’ve been talking to Rebel for years and she’s been encouraging me to do certain things. I knew she was right, but I resisted. I just wasn’t ready. Too challenging, too painful and it might not work -and then all that effort would have been wasted.

Which brings me to a desk card thingy on my desk called ‘The Daily Motivator’ which I (very) occasionally use. It has a card with a thought for every day of the year and you’re supposed to turn it each day and get motivated.

Today I flipped it and the proverb was totally apt - “First of all you must believe, but most of all you must ACT as if you believe”

It’s easy to be sceptical. I’ve been sceptical much of my life and know for sure that when we’re sceptical we always have ready-made excuses for NOT acting. On the other hand, I’ve seen so many times that when we decide to believe with all our heart and mind, and ACT like we believe, things just fall into place.

They. Just. Do. It’s a “vibe” thing. And more.

Next week I’m going to tell you about some of the things I’ve witnessed that have - finally - convinced me to stop the scepticism and let things flow.

Meanwhile, I have some homework for tomorrow and have to act on it - so here’s some homework for you.

Think of one thing you really believe in. Just one. I’m not even going to give you any hints. You decide.

Now, what action does that belief require? If you’re already doing it you know that it works.

But I bet you’re like me and have some beliefs you’ve let slip in the follow through department.

So. Now. Dare to try. Believe it. Act on it, - continually - and see it happen.

Remember “continually” is the key, and that Anything Can Happen!

Have a great week.

All the Best,

Kim

       

 


Who is Our Teacher?

Tuesday, January 28, 2014
When we stop learning we start to die.

Most of you probably know I am a teacher by trade and may also know that teachers are occasionally accused of being a bit, shall we say, “know it all”......

I know – ha ha – I’ve been guilty of that, but it really struck home late last year when I was attending a seminar conducted by an ex student, Nigel McReaddie, who trained under me for his first Black Belt many years ago and has since gone on to be a world renowned instructor and official in Koshiki Karatedo.

When we were discussing the seminar afterwards, Nigel remarked at “how much I had forgotten” his message wasn’t about how much I had known - but how much I had stopped learning and as a result was going backwards, fast.

To make the lesson even more obvious I was in the office of another ‘old’ student of mine, Anthony O’Leary the Principle of St Johns’ Primary school, and Subak Martial Arts School -  discussing plans for the coming year, when he challenged me by saying it was time I upgraded my professional qualifications.

The exciting thing is that since hearing - and acting - on those timely lessons, I feel ten years younger. I’m invigorated by being a student again, by the challenge of learning new things - and yes, the know it all in me just has to add -  relearning things I had forgotten.

Among other courses, I’m  taking a class every week run by Anthony’s son Zac O’Leary - kind of a student of student of student - figure it out, and I’m loving that most of all.

Remember the old saying. The teacher appears when the student is ready.

I’m loving being a grasshopper again.

Being physically fit makes it so much easier to learn. And it can be so easy. Go here for a great free 10 minute iKiEnergiser workout.

Or join now for lots more... 

       

 


Every single day, in every single way, we’re getting better.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

I must admit there are days, when the planets don’t align or the politicians are particularly pathetic, that I struggle to believe my own song. Sometimes it feels like it’s all uphill. But, as with everything else, hills can be gotten over.

Staying the course requires perspective and being able to recognise the silver lining - or at least admire the scary darkness of the cloud. When we’re toiling up those steep and slippery slopes, muscles aching and heart thumping, be mindful that when we reach the summit, rather than a lush mountain meadow, with butterflies, frolicking lambs and babbling brooks, we may well be confronted by a vista of more parched and rugged mountains stretching to the dauntingly distant horizon.

That’s when a sense of humour comes in handy.

Who remembers the ex prime minister who stated that “Life wasn’t meant to be easy” and some years later found himself outside his New York hotel with no pants and no reasonable explanation?

If we’re actively participating, the ups and downs of life catch us all eventually, but even the most shocking, scary or plain cringe worthy events can bring on gut busting hilarity after a sufficient length of time.

Or at least a wry smile.

The key is achieving distance. Perspective. To step back and admire the comedy of it all.

Life has a way of shrugging at even the greatest achievements, biggest disasters or most mundane non-events, but there’s always a laugh there if we look.

As my wife and Garfield (not the same person) would say, “Don’t take life too seriously, it’s temporary”
This week, let’s look for the laugh wherever we can.

And if it hurts too much to laugh, smile inside.

On a completely different note, take a moment to check out this music video of the band No Shame from Walgett Community School. It probably won’t make you laugh but it will definitely make you smile. Inside and out.
       



Archive